What is healthy? 4 steps anyone can take 

Posted on February 13, 2018 at 2:14 PM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids

Have the Olympics triggered conversations in your house about sports and having a healthy body?  Now is a great time to talk about the connection between physical activity and staying healthy.  You don't have to be a world-class athlete to have strong bones and muscles. Here is a simple formula that you can use every day (you may already be doing one or more of these activities) to help your body function in good form.    

Our friends at Let's Go! created a simple slogan to help you remember four ways to be healthy every day: 5-2-1-0. These research-proven recommendations come from experts at the American Academy of Pediatrics, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Tips for a Healthier Breakfast 2018

Posted on February 2, 2018 at 1:32 PM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids

You often hear that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, so it's important to make it count. Forget the doughnuts and the big-as-your-face muffins drowning in sugar sprinkles. A healthy breakfast includes a variety of whole grain, fruit, vegetable, dairy and meat or meat alternative combinations. With a little planning and our tips for a healthier breakfast, you’ll be well on your way to getting the recommended 5 or more servings of fruits and vegetables daily.

Child with breakfast smoothie

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How can healthcare providers help prevent childhood obesity?

Posted on December 29, 2017 at 1:29 PM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids

Families look to their healthcare providers for trusted health advice, especially when sorting through the noise of social media where health messages can be confusing and contradictory. But time is short at a wellness visit—with lots of topics to cover—and conversations about weight can be challenging for doctors and patients alike. So what can a healthcare practice do?

Focus on healthy behaviors

Help families remember what's "healthy" by promoting the nationally recognized, evidence-based 5-2-1-0 goals:

  • Eat 5 or more servings of fruits and vegetables per day
  • Limit screen time to 2 hours or less daily
  • Get at least 1 hour of physical activity
  • Drink 0 sugary beverages and more water

Hearing the 5-2-1-0 message at the doctor's office is consistent with health messages children are hearing at school and child care. This, in turn, helps keep good choices top of mind and more likely to become habit.

Additionally, focusing on 5-2-1-0 puts healthy behavior for all children at the forefront of your practice, rather than singling out overweight individuals and focusing on the negative. Consider incorporating the 5-2-1-0 Healthy Habits Questionnaire into your office work flow.

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Reduce screen time to improve children's health and development

Posted on December 22, 2017 at 1:18 PM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids

Before you turn on the TV, computer, or other electronic device for your child, consider these facts:

  • Screen time is habit-forming. The more time children engage with screens, the harder time they have turning electronics off as they become older children.
  • Over 50% of advertisements accompanying children’s TV shows are about foods. Up to 98% of these promote foods that are high in fat, sugar, and/or sodium.
  • The early years are critical. Limiting exposure to television during the first 4 years of life may decrease children’s interest in it in later.
  • Excessive screen time has been linked to irregular sleep and delayed language acquisition for children under the age of 3, as well as increased early childhood aggression.
  • Children who spend less time watching television in their early years tend to do better in school. They also have a healthier diet and are more physically active.
  • Reducing screen time can help prevent childhood obesity. This in turn means significantly reduced risk for diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure at young ages.
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7 More Resources for Physical Activity in Child Care

Posted on December 15, 2017 at 6:50 AM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids


Looking to start, expand, or freshen up your physical activity or health education program in the new year? We've rounded up 7 toolkits and curriculum resources for you to explore.

Animal Trackers

Animal Trackers is a complete motor skills and physical activity curriculum developed by the nation’s leading specialists in health and education. A program for preschool children ages 3-6, Animal Trackers features over 60 activities spread out over 10 units filled with colorful characters, games, songs, and stories. Creep and crawl like Lenny the Lizard, or gallop like Harry the Horse. Fee required to access program materials.

Check it out

Coordinated Approach to Child Health (CATCH) Early Childhood Coordination Kit

CATCH Early Childhood is designed to nurture a love of physical activity, provide an introduction to classroom-based gardening and nutrition, and encourage healthy eating in children ages 3-5. Little ones are motivated to walk, run, jump, dance, and move their whole bodies while playing and having fun.

Check it out

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Find the right community wellness partner

Posted on December 6, 2017 at 4:18 PM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids

Community engagement is an important part of a comprehensive workplace wellness program. Employers gain many advantages by engaging in community partnerships, but how do you choose effective partners for your community engagement efforts?

Effective community wellness partnerships require strategic planning and ongoing communication. You want to find a partner(s) whose interest in and commitment to improving wellness is well aligned with yours. 

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12 Physical Activity Recommendations for Your School Wellness Policy

Posted on November 30, 2017 at 4:55 PM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids

Physical activity is important to the overall health and well-being of everyone, including school-age children. The benefits are well documented and include significant reduction in health risks, building and maintenance of strong bones and muscles, improved health-related fitness, and positive social and mental health. Increasing scientific evidence suggests that healthier students are also better learners, and physical activity can improve academic achievement.

Schools are in an ideal position to influence children's health through increased physical activity, because school is where most children spend the majority of their time outside of home. A School Wellness Policy can help guide these efforts.

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How to avoid overeating this Thanksgiving (or at any holiday party)

Posted on November 22, 2017 at 6:37 AM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids

It's possible to celebrate Thanksgiving—or any holiday—without going overboard on sweet treats and calorie-laden food and beverages. Here are a few simple strategies to help support you in eating healthy at your Thanksgiving Day celebration. 

Drink water

Drinking water will help you stay hydrated and feel full. Additionally, by choosing water, you'll be avoiding empty liquid calories. Remember, that 12 oz can of Coke contains 140 calories and 10 teaspoons of sugar—skip it and you'll save room for dessert!

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Add physical activity to your Thanksgiving celebration

Posted on November 17, 2017 at 6:05 AM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids

Give thanks for good health this Thanksgiving by adding a new physically active tradition to your family's celebration. 

It's not a far-fetched idea. In fact, Thanksgiving Day boasts more run/walk races than any other day of the year. A record high 726 Thanksgiving Day races were recorded nationwide in 2016, with nearly a million finishers!

We've rounded up a few ideas for you to consider locally, including some tips for a do-it-yourself event at home.

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How to encourage active play in daycare, preschool

Posted on November 9, 2017 at 10:48 PM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids

If you work with children 5 years of age and younger, you probably already know that active play is important. But how much active play time do they need each day? What does "physical activity" for this age group look like? And how can you encourage active play if children are reluctant? 

Let's look at the key recommendations for child care providers at specific ages, as well as tips for reaching those recommendations in your daycare center, preschool, or home.

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