Offer fitness equipment to encourage physical activity at work

Posted on October 11, 2017 at 1:03 PM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids

Everybody needs at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity—enough to feel your heart pumping and increased breathing—every day. Luckily, we don't need to get all 60 minutes at once. 

Healthy workplaces stock a fitness area or activity room for employees to use during the workday. The return on investment in employees' physical activity is significant—improvements in employee health as well as improvements in productivity, absenteeism, and morale.

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Help reduce screen time with family activity kits

Posted on September 21, 2017 at 3:57 PM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids

What can you—as an employer, a school, a child care provider, or another community-based organization—do to help families unplug at home and limit recreational screen time to a maximum of two hours per day? 

Educating parents, children, and families about what is healthy—and what the consequences of excessive screen time are—is one strategy. But you can also support their efforts to reduce screen time by making alternative activities available. Try offering activity kits. 

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Things to know about sports drinks and energy drinks

Posted on July 6, 2017 at 11:28 PM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids

Makers of sports drinks and energy drinks brag about the beverages' benefits, but physicians and other scientists tell a different story. 

Save your money, drink water

"Sports drinks" are flavored beverages that contain carbohydrates (usually sugar—like 18 teaspoons of it) and eletrolytes such as sodium and potassium. Ads claim to help athletes rehydrate and replace important nutrients lost through sweat better than water does. Popular brands include Gatorade and Powerade. 

"Energy drinks" claim to increase energy, aid weight loss, and improve concentration. Popular brands include Monster, Red Bull, and Rockstar. 

But the truth is that few of us actually need sports drinks, and energy drinks are outright dangerous for children and teens. To save money and promote good health, drink water instead.

 

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What is healthy? 4 steps anyone can take

Posted on June 21, 2017 at 11:57 PM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids

Lots of us express a desire to "be healthier," and to "raise healthy children," but what does that mean, exactly? Health and wellness tips may be widely available, but sometimes they feel contradictory and confusing. How do you know which sources to trust?

Our friends at Let's Go! created a simple slogan to help you remember four ways to be healthy every day: 5-2-1-0. These research-proven recommendations come from experts at the American Academy of Pediatrics, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Move more: physical activity tips for work and home

Posted on February 23, 2017 at 12:50 AM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids

The causes of the obesity epidemic are numerous and complex, but no doubt our increasingly sedentary lifestyle is a key contributor.

Experts recommend a minimum of one hour of physical activity per day—for children and adults alike—but it doesn't have to happen all at once. In fact, peppering the day with short bursts of low-intensity physical activity has substantial health benefits that rival longer single sessions of vigorous activity.

Why do we need physical activity breaks?

Frequent activity breaks help the heart work more efficiently. They also help trim waistlines, improve blood pressure and lower triglycerides and other blood fat levels. Other facts:

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Healthy Community: increasing public awareness and engagement to decrease child obesity

Posted on January 18, 2017 at 10:40 PM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids

2016 Year in Review - part three in a series of four

Jump IN’s mission is to promote policies and practices that create healthy environments where families and children have real opportunities to make healthy choices and engage in healthy behaviors. Research shows that if healthy nutrition and physical activity policies can be implemented in the places where children and families spend most of their time, their health will likely improve.

In Part One of this Year in Review series we described what we did in 2016 to increase the number of healthy choices that family members have in their workplaces, schools, child care settings, and personal homes. In Part Two we described the launch of our first community demonstration project in Greater Lawrence/Far Eastside, a nationally recognized effort to employ numerous strategies across multiple sectors to increase health in a concentrated geographic region.

In this post we look at our 2016 efforts to engage and educate the larger community for the benefit of central Indiana families.

Healthy Community

Beyond their schools, child care centers, workplaces, homes, and neighborhoods, children and families are also members of a larger community whose values, norms, and policies shape the broader environment in which these families live. For that reason, Jump IN works to influence that environment by encouraging educational conversations on healthy habits, urging the adoption of targeted public policies that promote healthy living, and fostering an overall culture of good health in the community.

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Healthy Places: embedding healthy nutrition and physical activity policies in everyday settings

Posted on January 6, 2017 at 6:00 AM by Jump IN for Healthy Kids

2016 Year in Review - part one in a series of four

The new year brings the opportunity to pause and reflect on 2016 and our progress in reducing the prevalence of childhood obesity. In this series of four Year in Review stories, we summarize some of our most significant accomplishments to date.

Healthy Places

Jump IN’s mission is to promote policies and practices that create healthy environments where families and children have real opportunities to make healthy choices and engage in healthy behaviors.Much of Jump IN’s work is grounded in this fact:

Changing the environment is the best way to change behaviors.

Research shows that if healthy nutrition and physical activity policies can be implemented in the places where children and families spend most of their time, their health will likely improve. Here’s how we helped schools, child care centers, worksites, and family homes embed healthy nutrition and physical activity policies and practices in 2016:

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